A Singular Way Of Stealing Wigs


I was browsing the Anecdotes of the Manner and Customs of London During the Eighteenth Century book by James Peller Malcolm, when I came across this curious piece of news about a singular method of stealing wigs. The author presented it verbatim from the Weekly Journal of March 30 1717:

"The Thieves have got such a villainous way now of robbing gentlemen, that they cut holes through the backs of Hackney coaches, and take away their wigs, or fine headdresses of gentlewomen; so a gentleman was served last Sunday in Tooley-street, and another but last Tuesday in Fenchurch-street; wherefore, this may serve for a caution to gentlemen or gentlewomen that ride single in the night-time, to sit on the fore-seat, which will prevent that way of robbing."

Further reading:
Anecdotes of the Manner and Customs of London During the Eighteenth Century