Book Reviews: The Emotionally Sensitive Person, Writing Great Books For Young Adults, The Little Book Of Big PR, & The Little Red Book Of PR Wisdom

Hello everyone,

ready for today's reviews? I have four for you today. Here we go:


The Emotionally Sensitive Person: Finding Peace When Your Emotions Overwhelm You by Karyn D. Hall PhD
Do you experience things more intensely than those around you? Can you feel other people's pain or joy? Are you easily overwhelmed by your emotions? Do you react to them too quickly without thinking about the consequences? Are you often told "you are too sensitive"? Then, this book is for you.
Hypersensitivity is a real condition that causes those affected by it to be more sensitive to both internal and external stimuli. While this has its pros (emotionally sensitive people are usually more aware and creative), when not managed properly, hypersensitivity can have debilitating consequences, including poor health, emotional instability, and relationship problems. Luckily, there are many techniques and strategies emotionally sensitive people can use to help them manage their emotions.
This book starts with a quiz that will help you figure out if you are an emotionally sensitive person. After that, each chapter concentrates on one aspect of hypersensitivity, explaining how it can affect your life and what strategy you can adopt to address it. Most of the exercises and remedies proposed are based on cognitive behavioural therapy and mindless practices. They help you become more aware of your emotions and modify your reactions to them so that you can better deal with them.
The book is written in a simple., straightforward style that's both engaging and easy to understand for both professionals and laymen alike. I highly recommend it.
Available at: Amazon
Rating: 4/5

Writing Great Books For Young Adults: Everything You Need to Know, from Crafting the Idea to Landing a Publishing Deal by Regina Brooks
Young adult books are very popular right now. If you are thinking of penning one or already have and are now shopping around for a publisher, I highly encourage you to pick up a copy of this book. Drawing from her experience as a literary agent, Regina Brooks breaks down the whole process, from developing ideas to submitting queries to agents, into easy to implement steps. Each chapter deals with a different, major, area, such as theme, character development, setting, satisfactory endings, finding the right agent, and lots more.
But if you're looking for a magic formula to create the next Harry Potter or Twilight books, you'll be disappointing. No one can write a novel or nonfiction book for you. What Brooks does is simply provide some guidelines and explain what attracts young adults agents and readers and what makes them throw your book in the trash instead. But, of course, you can always disregard her advice and do your own thing. But in that case, you'll better do it well and be innovative and original.
Brooks writes in a straightforward and engaging way that informs you without boring. There is nothing preachy or condescending about her advice. At times, she may seem a bit harsh, but that's because she's honest. As an agent, she rejects many manuscripts every day, and she wants to make sure yours isn't one of them.
Available at: Amazon
Rating: 4/5

The Little Book of Big PR: 100+ Quick Tips to Get Your Business Noticed by Jennefer Witter
Any business needs good PR to thrive. Too many, though, believe they don't have the money for it. If that's you, you may want to read The Little Book Of Big PR. In it, Witter explains how you can get your unfair share of attention without spending a lot of money. She shares more than 100 tips on any aspect of public relations you need to attract attention to your business, such as branding, media relations, social media, networking, and, for those with bigger budgets who need some extra help, selecting a good PR agency. Each chapter also features a case study to show you how a company thrived after putting these tips into practice.
You don't have to follow all these tips. Not everything will apply to you. And in some areas, you may already be an expert. Just pick and choose those you believe will be more helpful for your situation and the goal you have in mind. If you already are a pro at PR, you will already be familiar with most of the advice, but there are so many tips here that you'll probably learn a thing or two too.
The book is short and concise. Witter doesn't waste time chit-chatting, but goes straight to the point. Yet the tone is engaging and will keep your attention throughout the end. Highly recommended.
Available at: Amazon
Rating: 4/5

The Little Red Book Of PR Wisdom by Brian Johnson
If The Little Book Of Big PR is aimed at small business owners wanting to attract attention to their products, The Little Red Book Of PR Wisdom is written for PR novices who'd like to learn how to work with the media to successfully promote their clients. Johnson teaches you how to write a press release that won't be binned straight away, how to contact the right people for your campaign, how to answer interview questions, how to repair a damaged reputation, how to use social media and a lot more. He also debunks common mistakes about PR and shares the most common mistakes novices make... and how to fix them.
Each chapter is short, concise and entertaining. Johnson doesn't preach. On the contrary, his witty style will teach you a few useful techniques and make you laugh at the same time. Each chapter is also full of case studies as well as anecdotes from the author's experience in the world of PR. Each one closes with advice from journalists, editors, and producers. These are the people who decide whether to publish or bin your story, so heed what they say! Practical, fun, and informative, this is a book anyone who is thinking of, or has just started, a career in PR should read.
Available at: Amazon
Rating: 4/5

Which of these books would you like to read?

Disclaimer: this book was sent by PR for consideration. In addition, this post contains affiliate links.